chess lessons

Chess Lessons

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olympio 27 ( +1 | -1 )
idea to help improve sight of the board.

do you think taking a position, then quickly (as quickly as possible) counting the number of moves the side-to-move has would be a good excersize in chess vision and maybe to some degree calculation?

just a thought..
superblunder 29 ( +1 | -1 )
Yes. This is elementary in calculation, and every experienced, strong chess player does it, even if unconsciously. (not so much 'count' the moves, but be aware of all the possible moves for both sides). Of course the 'exercise' you describe is very basic and would only be useful for blitz training.
riga 34 ( +1 | -1 )
computers computers do this. They have very limited refrences of where to start their calculations due to lack of logic so they quickly analye ever possible move, mark some and then examine those in depth.

There are 20 possible starting moves and usually around 40 in a good middle game
riga 34 ( +1 | -1 )
computers computers do this. They have very limited refrences of where to start their calculations due to lack of logic so they quickly analye ever possible move, mark some and then examine those in depth.

There are 20 possible starting moves and usually around 40 in a good middle game
caldazar 108 ( +1 | -1 )
I have my doubts Whiel computers do indeed perform this exercise to some degree, in general, human beings don't think this way. Instead, they focus in on a few key moves, usually moves that are associated with some plan. I've often encountered situations where I"ll point out a certain move to a much stronger play in a post-mortem only to have him respond with mild surprise ("I didn't even consider that to be a candidate move.", "Naw, this is obvious and easy to play." etc...).

Some psychology studies have indicated that board vision is related to viewing chess positions not as an arrangement of pieces but rather as an arrangement of chess groupings. Groupings such as "kingside castling with a kingside fianchetto", "c3,d4,e4 against d6,e5", and such seem to occupy the thoughts of strong players. In general, the vision of good players is no better than that of lesser players when random positions are set up.

In the starting position, is there anything really to be gained by seeing that you're legally allowed to play 1.a4, after all?
olympio 52 ( +1 | -1 )
i'm not talking i'm not talking about the way players think or the way computers think.. just suggesting an EXCERSIZE to help improve your sight of the board.

superblunder you started off by saying every experienced strong player does it.. but in your next sentence i realized you were missing my point. i'm simply talking about an arbitrary excersize in rapidity of counting possible moves be they arbitrary. (and no i don't believe experienced strong players are aware of every move.. that would be a waste of brain power.)
bogg 24 ( +1 | -1 )
olympio I don't think that the phrase 'site of the board' refers to an act of seeing but to one of understanding. I think it is really describing 'seeing' what is pertinent to the position. I don't see how enumerating the legal moves would improve a players ability in this area at all.
drgandalf 13 ( +1 | -1 )
Is there a good book On calculation for a GK player rated 1800. USCF 1540. Intermediate player.

Too many books are written for advanced players.